Square Wraps


I am not sure how "new" this bread from Warburtons is, but I only discovered it three weeks ago. During this time I had loads of it. I used it in all manners possible. Wraps, mezze scope, folded and toasted and topped with all kinds of ingredients and flashed under the grill.

I have the tendency to do that whenever I discover a new ingredient. For a month or so I try all kind of things, some successful and some disastrous. By the end of this period my wife, and quite often myself, are bored with the ingredient in question but at least I have a clear idea what is it good for. I will have to say, this bread passed this testing period with a great success. I was impressed however way I used it.

The bread is inspired or "pinched" from the legendary Damascus Bakery, Brooklyn, New York. The bakery was established in 1930 by a Syrian immigrant. Eighty one years later his two grand children are still running a family business that expanded to become a nation wide success story.

The bread itself is very good indeed and despite no resembling any native Damascene bread there is something peculiarly Arabic about it. It is a lot better for wraps than tortilla especially if the stuffing is Arabic inspired. You can also use the bread in a similar manner to Arabic flat bread to scoop mezze and breakfast dishes. It works all right but can't compare to the real thing.

The best use by far is a pizza or fatayer base. Just spread whatever ingredients you like, three minutes under the grill and you get yourself an excellent dinner.

Finally for all the parents out there I thought I should share with you a childhood favourite that I rediscovered in the last few weeks, Fake Pizza. This was my mum emergency dish when we wanted something nice and child friendly for supper. To make my mum pizza just spread some ketchup on the bread, sprinkle some dry oregano, any kind of cold meat, some olives and mozzarella cheese. Few minutes under the grill and you got yourself a dinner.


17 comments:

Anonymous said...

isnt this similar to marouk or shirak bread found throughout the Levant?

Kano said...

@anonymous
It is similar but different if that makes sense. It is softer and more yeasty than the original.

Gosia said...

Now I wonder where it comes from the real progenitor of pizza?

Jana said...

Great blog...mouthwatering dishes...I was wondering if you had the recipe of a dish called حراء اصبعو which is translated into burnt finger ? I was told it was a syrian kind of appetizer.

Kano said...

@Gosia
Welcome to my blog. I might be a bit thick today but I did't get your comment.

@Jana
Welcome to my blog. I will post a Haraa Esbaoo recipe in due course. At this stage I am not managing to write much on the blog. I will try to write more I promise.

Angel of the North said...

Wish they sold this outside cities.

Kano said...

@Angle of the North

Did you try the internet?

Michelle said...

It looks like lavash which is found primarily in Armenia, Iran and Afghanistan.

Anonymous said...

Lavash is NOT found in Afghanistan

Kano said...

@Michelle

It does look like Lavash but the feel is completely different.

Ayden @ Himalayan Salt said...

Sorry no comments about the post above, but I have to say, I love the blog - coming from a Kurdish Syrian!

Kano said...

@Ayden

Thank you very much. I am glad you like the blog. Please come back. I know I haven't been writing lately but I will try to start writing again soon.

Ruby said...

I bought some of this a few weeks ago and used it for mana'ish zaatar. It was a bit too thin for that, but I bet it's great for fatayer and sfeeha, which will be my next attempt. Also, as you indicated, perfect for wraps - I like to make wraps with leftover masakhan. So pleased to have found your blog (my dad's family moved to Damascus in '48 and my husband is native of Aleppo) and good to see that great minds do think alike! ;-)

Tatertot said...

I love your blog! So many great recipes. I went to college with a few Halabee's and I'm so happy to have recipes that match up what they used to make. Please come back soon!

Sarah said...

Kano, you're not blogging at all anymore? Too bad. I just started again (writing bout food, that is, I still keep writing bout other stuff elsewhere as well).

Sarah

Kano said...

@Sarah

I haven't written anything for a long while as you can see. I am finding it very difficult writing with everything going on in Syria. Most of my online time is on twitter reading and writing about Syria.

I have plenty to write about and I have photographed many new recipes I just need the time and the will.

Kano said...

@tatertot

Thank you very much for the nice words and welcome to my blog.

I hope I will start writing soon.

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